George Bernard ShawC A L L    F O R    P A P E R S

 

 

 “SHAW IN THE 30s: DRAMA AND DICTATORIAL POLITICS”

 

A SPECIAL SESSION (#23) ON BERNARD SHAW

AT THE 2012 MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION CONVENTION
JANUARY 5-8, 2012.
  SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2011

 

Sponsored by the International Shaw Society

Presiding: Lawrence Switzky, University of Toronto

 

PHOTO GALLERY BELOW

PROGRAM

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SHAW IN THE WASTELAND?

 
The Modern Language Association Convention scheduled for Seattle in January of 2012 will feature another Special Shaw Session.   Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words (with title) and an up-to-date CV by March 15, 2011 to Lawrence Switzky at lawrence.switzky@utoronto.ca.   You of course have to be a member of MLA to deliver a paper, but you do not have to be a member to attend the session, as follows:     

 

TOPIC: “Shaw in the 30s: Drama and Dictatorial Politics”

In the 1930s, among many other things, Bernard Shaw wrote six full-length plays, feted Albert Einstein, dallied outrageously with “The Dictators,” visited the United States for the first (and second) time, and won an Academy Award.  Even by the standards of a master of paradox, the 1930s was a decade of artistic and political extremes for Shaw.  Much of Shaw’s subsequent reception has been tinctured by both his humanitarian work and the putative development of his “darker side” during these years.  This panel offers an opportunity to re-evaluate this complex period in Shaw’s career:

Ř as an artist (through any of the plays or prose writings from Too True To Be Good and The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God through ‘In Good King Charles’s Golden Days’)

Ř a political propagandist (as, for instance, a critic of democracy, a sincere or ironic advocate of fascism, a Zionist and counter-Zionist, a champion of revolutionary socialism)

Ř a celebrity in and theorist of mass media (through his radio broadcasts and appearances on newsreels)

Ř a world traveler and early post-colonialist

Ř a votary of the Life Force in the grip of old age, determined to be “more revolutionary” as he aged.

Papers are welcome on any aspect of Shaw’s investment in the ‘30s and his place among its fulgurous debates, figures, and movements. Panelists are also encouraged to read Shaw through any of the modernisms that emerged in the 1930s (e.g. “New Deal Modernism”) or through the formal and stylistic features that characterize his later work.

 

THE PROGRAM FOR “SHAW IN THE 30s: DRAMA AND DICTATORIAL POLITICS”    (at http://www.mla.org/program_details?prog_id=S618)

A special session, # 23, Thursday, 5 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 604, WSCC  

Presiding: Lawrence Switzky, Univ. of Toronto, Mississauga

1. "Politics, Allegory, and Mortality in On the Rocks," Charles J. Del Dotto, Duke Univ.

2. "Exotic Fable or Stalinist Allegory? Taking Another Look at Shaw's The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles," Matthew Yde, Ohio State Univ., Columbus

3. "Shaw's Subjunctive: The Dramaturgy of Extravaganza and the Extremities of Political Imagination," David Kornhaber, Univ. of Texas, Austin

For abstracts, write to lawrence.switzky@utoronto.ca.

 

You can discover how to register for the 2012 MLA convention by going to http://www.mla.org/convention.

 

PHOTO GALLERY:

Shaw at the Independent Labour Party summer camp, 1930.

G.B. Shaw's photographs reproduced with the permission of the Society of Authors.  George Bernard Shaw Photographs at the London School of Economics, at

http://archiveshub.ac.uk/features/georgebernardshaw/georgebernardshaw-independentlabourparty.html

 

Shaw at summer camp

 

 

 

 

 

From the website “DVD Talk,” at http://www.dvdtalk.com/silentdvd/ more_treasures.html.  The still is from a 5 min. 1928 film, Greetings by George Bernard Shaw, with optional commentary by Donald Crafton: : An early sound film featuring the famous playwright talking to the audience and making faces.  He does a Mussolini impersonation, a person that he describes as “most genial” and “amiable.” His Irish accent and speech mannerisms make it pretty clear that this is satire, but this appears on YouTube and in Glen Beck’s propaganda clips as though it were to be taken “straight.”
 

 
http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/images/reviews/81/1095722824.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

George Bernard Shaw
What I Really Wrote about the War.

New York: Publishers Brentano’s, [1932].

The dust jacket for this edition was designed by Alexander Nesbitt.

Sidney P. Albert -- George Bernard Shaw Collection at Brown University.  See http://www.brown.edu/Facilities/University_Library/exhibits/shaw/politics.html .

 

 
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For the entire collection of book covers at Brown University under “The Quintessential G.B.S. : Politics,”

see  http://www.brown.edu/Facilities/University_Library/exhibits/shaw/politics .

 

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